No more Windows 10 Insider builds for the rest of 2020 as the team "recharges for what's in store for 2021"

| |

Microsoft just announced that there will be no more Windows 10 Insider builds for the rest of 2020 as the team takes some time off for the holidays and recharges for what's in store for 2021. The announcement comes after the Insider team tried to get a new RS_PRERELEASE build out, but didn't hit the quality bar.

With this announcement, the Windows Insider program caps off the year 2020 in a couple of different places. On the FE_RELEASE branch of the Windows 10 Dev channel, the most recent (and final 2020) build will be 20279. This comes with no new features. Meanwhile, on the new opt-in RS_PRERELEASE branch of the Windows 10 Dev channel, the most recent (and final 2020) build comes in at 21277. This release brings support for x64 emulation on Windows 10 on ARM PCs.

As a reminder, this optional "opt-in" ability to the RS_PRERELEASE channel is because the Dev Channel had a "split." Microsoft says it will stay in place like this so they can get feedback on FE_RELEASE until all Insiders in the Dev Channel will start to receive RS_PRERELEASE builds sometime after the holidays. For now, though, Insiders who choose to stay put will continue to automatically get builds from the FE_RELEASE. Rumor has it that this is for testing Windows 10X, code.

Elsewhere, in the Beta and Release Preview channels, the final build of the year 2020 comes in at 19042.685. Released on December 8, this one comes with some patches for Microsoft Edge, Windows Media, Windows Fundamentals, and Windows Virtualization.

It definitely has been a busy year in the Windows Insider program, and we look forward to what's coming heading into the year 2021. Windows Sunvalley redesign and the "Cobalt" update, and Windows 10X are two big things we're hoping for. Happy holidays, Windows Insiders!

Share This Post:

Previous

Microsoft to extend digital refund offer to all Xbox players unsatisfied with Cyberpunk 2077

Microsoft reportedly designing its own chips for servers, Surface devices

Next