Microsoft Windows exec says iPad cannibalizing netbooks

Microsoft's Windows product management GM Gavriella Schuster surprised the industry with remarks that the iPad was taking away netbook sales. When asked about the trend, the division leader said netbooks were "definitely getting cannibalized" by tablets, of which the iPad is nearly the only model. Both netbooks and tablets were "and" devices that were supplements to a main computer, she stressed to Seattle's Post-Intelligencer, but this made netbooks vulnerable...

Microsoft: not seeing a shift to tablets despite iPad

Microsoft during the call discussing its latest fiscal results claimed that the iPad wasn't having an effect on computer sales. Investor relations GM Bill Koefoed dodged around mentioning Apple by name but said Microsoft had "not seen a shift" from notebooks towards tablets. He didn't say how Microsoft could prove this but saw overall PC sales up between nine and 11 percent in the summer, with work PCs up about 15 percent.

The company was "enthusiastic" about tablets and was confident that, in tablets, Microsoft could provide "choice and value" across devices...

Intel, Microsoft, and the curious case of the iPad

Brooke Crothers: "That tablet thing? Yeah, we'll get back to you on that." That's a crude but fairly accurate encapsulation of the attitude Microsoft, Intel, and Advanced Micro Devices have toward the iPad and the tablet market in general.

Why the cavalier attitude? Before I defer to the opinion of an IDC analyst I interviewed (below), here's one pretty obvious reason I'll put forward. All three companies look at their revenue streams--traditional PC hardware and software on laptops, desktops, and servers--and come to the conclusion that the tablet is a marginal market. A deceptively accurate conclusion, because at this point in time--and even 12 months out--the tablet is marginal compared with the gargantuan laptop, desktop, and server markets...