Former Google Cloud exec to head up Microsoft’s GitHub

Microsoft, GitHub

Open source repository GitHub has announced the hire of former Google Cloud Platform product management director Shanku Niyogi as its head of product development.

Niyogi, who spent the past the last year working on Google’s Cloud product development, is essentially returning to Microsoft in a different capacity. Prior to his year at Google, Niyogi spent a twenty-year chunk of his career working for Microsoft as a general manager and director for Visual Studios.

Now that Microsoft has become the parent company of GitHub, Niyogi’s hire seems a like match made in heaven as his relationships with the IDE community of Visual Studios may help him integrate needed bridges to the open source development community he’ll now be advocating for.

“At GitHub, we want to be the home for all developers. Over the years, I’ve had a chance to work on a number of developer products- including Visual Studio Code, Typescript, .NET, Kubernetes, Go, and Chef. None of those would have had the impact they did without passionate developer teams, strong open source communities, and the homes they had on GitHub.”

Microsoft has already done some of the heavy lifting in attempting to merge the two historically opposing worlds of open source and Windows development by putting Visual Studio Code on GitHub and open sourcing that project.

However, as Microsoft’s reliance on Windows continues to dwindle, it seems Niyogi’s future may be more of spurring Microsoft-friendly enterprise development and specific tools for the company’s new revenue hoarder, Azure cloud.

“Businesses of every size are becoming software organizations and finding that they have to innovate faster than ever. Doing so doesn’t just require the right tools-companies also need the right talent. With GitHub, every enterprise has the potential to connect with a community of more than 31 million developers, their code, and their software practices, securely and effectively.”

GitHub and Microsoft’s future ambitions appear to be on parallel tracks and it seems as though its only a matter of time before they converge fully.

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