Facebook Beta app for Windows 10 is not a Project Islandwood port

In mid-November of this year, Facebook Beta for Windows 10 appeared in the Windows Store. Microsoft had stated that a universal Facebook app would be launching soon and we already have a taste of that with the Windows 10 Mobile Facebook app. Currently, the desktop app is being tested and will likely be rolled out early next year.

It was originally rumored that the Facebook Beta app for Windows 10 was a Project Islandwood port, meaning the code was ported from iOS to Windows 10. You can head over here to read about Project Islandwood. In a nutshell, Project Islandwood is the codename for “Windows Bridge for iOS” allowing developers to build a Universal Windows Platform app using Visual Studio 2015 while using existing code from an iOS app. Project Astoria (Windows Bridge for Android), for those wondering, was put on hold indefinitely.

According to a tweet from Rudy Huyn, the Facebook app for Windows 10 is not a Project Islandwood app, rather it was ported using “Osmeta.”Osmeta was a Mountain View-based mobile software startup that was acquired by Facebook about two years ago. Osmeta had the tools necessary to theoretically have one core functionality run across multiple platforms.

This doesn’t change the fact that the app is a “bridged” app or port from iOS, but it’s cool to know what technology was used to make it happen. Now if only we can see all these different Facebook apps bridged together into just one app, so people aren’t confused on which app belongs to who (I kid, I kid!)

For all you app developers out there, have you experimented with Project Islandwood? Should there be more tools available for app developers to create bridged apps? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Thanks BiggishTuba558 for the tip!

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