CES 2016: Netflix expands to cover almost the entire globe

Netflix

Netflix has continued its global expansion with a rather large push during the last 24 hours that has brought the total number of countries the media streaming service is now available in up to 130 from the previous 60.

Originally launching in North America in 2007, the company has been rather aggressive with its growth during the past few years, recently rolling out to countries such as Australia, New Zealand and Japan.

Netflix Co-founder and Chief Executive, Reed Hastings, spoke about the company’s growth at CES 2016 and announced that, “Today you are witnessing the birth of a new global Internet TV network. With this launch, consumers around the world — from Singapore to St. Petersburg, from San Francisco to Sao Paulo — will be able to enjoy TV shows and movies simultaneously — no more waiting. With the help of the Internet, we are putting power in consumers’ hands to watch whenever, wherever and on whatever device.”

Despite the #NetflixEverywhere hashtag being used during the conference, there are still several countries where Netflix is unavailable such as China, Crimea, North Korea and Syria. Still, the fact that Netflix has launched in 130 out of the 196 (depending on who you ask) countries around the world is pretty damn impressive and they now have almost all major markets covered. The company also added Arabic, Korean, Simplified and Traditional Chinese language options to its existing 17 languages earlier today.

Netflix is currently viewable via a variety of official apps on Windows 10 devices, Window 10 Mobile phones, and Microsoft’s Xbox 360 and Xbox One videogame consoles. With Netflix being made officially available in so many new regions, these apps will also be releasing in their respective app marketplaces to coincide with the launch.

Are you a Netflix user? How do you like to watch it? Share your experiences with the WinBeta community in the comments below.

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Netflix
Developer: ‪Netflix, Inc.‬
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