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Apple bigger than Intel and Microsoft combined

According to a recent report, Apple has the biggest market value than Microsoft and Intel combined. This is all thanks to Apple’s iPhone and iPad products which has allowed the company to achieve $400 dollars a share for the first time.

“It started with the Mac, then iPods, iPhones and now the iPad. It’s incredible,” said Giri Cherukuri, head trader for Oakbrook Investments.

Apple currently has a market captial of roughly $363 billion dollars and is nearly catching up with the world’s most valuable company, Exxon Mobile, who has $416 billion in market capital.

Just recently, Apple posted its third quarter earnings and stated that the company had sold 20 million iPhones in just the third quarter. Compared to a year ago, Apple saw an increase in iPhone sales by 183%.

Microsoft may have earned $17.37 billion dollars in revenue during the fourth-quarter of this year, but the company has a long way to go to overcome Apple. Microsoft has a market capital of $228 billion dollars while Intel has a $119 billion capital. If you add this up, it totals $347 billion, which is less than Apple’s $363 billion (according to Google Finance).

Apple has proven to be a major blow to companies like Microsoft as shares continues to increase due to product popularity. Apple was able to earn $7.3 billion dollars in just the third quarter, considering that the company did not release a blockbuster product in nearly six months.

“We’re thrilled to deliver our best quarter ever, with revenue up 82 percent and profits up 125 percent. Right now, we’re very focused and excited about bringing iOS 5 and iCloud to our users this fall. We are extremely pleased with our performance which drove quarterly cash flow from operations of $11.1 billion, an increase of 131 percent year-over-year. Looking ahead to the fourth fiscal quarter of 2011, we expect revenue of about $25 billion and we expect diluted earnings per share of about $5.50,” Apple stated.

Who is going to slow down Apple?

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