Time for an SSD? At $249 for 120GB, Intel thinks so

On Friday, Intel introduced its most competitively priced solid-state drive yet and will be selling the drive to consumers through major retail outlets. Are SSDs finally becoming a worthy upgrade?

The Intel X25-M 120GB Solid-State Drive is set to be offered at Best Buy and Fry's Electronics for a suggested retail price of $249. Newegg is already selling the drive. Competitive SSDs would include a 128GB drive for $269 from Crucial...

Intel, Microsoft, and the curious case of the iPad

Brooke Crothers: "That tablet thing? Yeah, we'll get back to you on that." That's a crude but fairly accurate encapsulation of the attitude Microsoft, Intel, and Advanced Micro Devices have toward the iPad and the tablet market in general.

Why the cavalier attitude? Before I defer to the opinion of an IDC analyst I interviewed (below), here's one pretty obvious reason I'll put forward. All three companies look at their revenue streams--traditional PC hardware and software on laptops, desktops, and servers--and come to the conclusion that the tablet is a marginal market. A deceptively accurate conclusion, because at this point in time--and even 12 months out--the tablet is marginal compared with the gargantuan laptop, desktop, and server markets...

Intel Sandy Bridge many-core secret sauce

During the coming-out party for Intel's Sandy Bridge microarchitecture at Chipzilla's developer shindig in San Francisco this week, two magic words were repeatedly invoked in tech session after tech session: "modular" and "scalable". Key to those Holy Grails of architectural flexibility is the architecture's ring interconnect.

"We have a very modular architecture," said senior principal engineer Opher Kahn at one session. "This ring architecture is laid out in such a way that we can easily add and remove cores as necessary. The graphics can also have different versions."

Intel sheds light on future technology at IDF 2010

Intel is a semiconductor manufacturing company whose raison d'etre is to churn out computer chips by the million. It spends billions of dollars on engineering and infrastructure - building hugely expensive fabrication plants - and continues to hold a commanding market share in providing processors that power the vast majority of PCs.

[...] The world doesn't really care what kind of technology resides in products. Rather, it cares about what it enables you to do: Apple iPhone being a very obvious case in point. So what does this all mean for the chip giant? At the Intel Developer Forum - a yearly technology showcase held in San Francisco - the firm rolled out examples of how it views technology development and enablement for Joe Average...