PC games come to TV with OnLive's MicroConsole

Dan Ackerman: We've been reasonably impressed to date with OnLive's cloud-based game service, which allows nearly any Internet-connected laptop or desktop to play a variety of high-end PC games via a unique streaming system. The company's long-awaited MicroConsole, which skips the computer altogether and streams games directly to your TV, finally has a release date and price.

The OnLive MicroConsole ships December 2 for $99, and includes a free game (games typically cost the same as retail boxed versions, around $49) and a wireless game controller...

Amazon Web Services Introduces High Performance Cluster GPU Instance

Amazon Web Services: A few years ago advanced developers of numerical and scientific application started to use GPUs to perform general-purpose calculations, termed GPGPU, for General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units. Application development continued to grow as the demands of many additional applications were met with advances in GPU technology, including high performance double precision floating point and ECC memory.

However, accessibility to such high-end technology, particularly on HPC cluster infrastructure for tightly coupled applications, has been elusive for many developers. Today we are introducing our latest EC2 instance type (this makes eleven, if you are counting at home) called the Cluster GPU Instance. Now any AWS user can develop and run GPGPU on a cost-effective, pay-as-you-go basis...

Cloud, meet Rainbow

The Rainbow add-on for Firefox is an early developer prototype that enables web developers to access local video and audio recording capabilities using just a few lines of JavaScript. The add-on generates files encoded in open formats: Theora (for video) and Vorbis (for audio) in an Ogg container. The resulting files are accessible in DOM using HTML5 File APIs, which may be used to upload them to a server. Check out the included example to see how simple it really is!

The new Google Search Appliance - a bridge to the cloud

In the last year, businesses have started using cloud-based applications from Google and other technology providers at an accelerated rate. While many organizations still have information that resides in on-premise systems, more and more important business information today is living in the cloud, in collaborative tools like Google Apps—now used by more than 3 million businesses—and services like Twitter. Starting today, Cloud Connect for the Google Search Appliance lets workers search across both on-premise and cloud-based content from a single search box, delivering more comprehensive results and improving productivity. We’ve also added a few other handy features that make it easier to collaborate and find information faster.

The Future of Cloud Computing: The Big 25 in the Next 25

The past 25 years have brought a digital age of Internet, massive computing power, high-speed data transmission, mobile communication, and more recently, the cloud, which brings it all together. Over the next 25 years, as technology advances and infrastructure increases, cloud computing will continue to change our world.

According to a recent survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, about 70% of Americans will be using cloud-based applications as their primary tools by 2020—both at work and in their free time. It’s already happening, of course—people accessing cloud-based applications like email and social media from their smart phones, streaming movies from Netflix®, and hosting their family pictures online—but just imagine what is on the horizon...