Windows 10 version 1809 gets minor patch to fix Japanese calendar bug, but you can only install it manually

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Microsoft has quietly released a new optional patch for Windows 10 version 1809 yesterday, with the build 17763.439 (via ComputerWorld). This new cumulative update is a pretty minor one, though it includes nine different fixes to support the new Japanese Era and its associated calendar that began on May 1, 2019.

Here is the full list of quality improvements included in this new patch:

  • Addresses an issue that prevents the CALDATETIME structure from handling more than four Japanese Eras. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Updates the NLS registry to support the new Japanese Era. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue that causes the DateTimePicker to display the date incorrectly in the Japanese date format. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue that causes the Date and Time Settings control to cache old Eras and prevents the control from refreshing when the time enters the new Japanese Era. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Updates fonts to support the new Japanese Era. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue that prevents an input method editor (IME) from supporting the new Japanese Era character. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue that causes the Clock and Calendar flyout control to display the day of the week incorrectly mapped to a date in the month of the new Japanese Era. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Adds alternative fonts for the new Japanese Era fonts. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Enables Text-To-Speech (TTS) functionality to support new Japanese Era characters. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue in Unified Write Filter (UWF) that prevents Hibernate Once/Resume Many (HORM) from working as expected on Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) systems.

Interestingly, this optional update isn’t available on Windows Update yet. Microsoft noted that it’s only available through Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), and you can also get it from the Microsoft Update Catalog website. In case you decide to skip it, be aware you’ll still get all these fixes in the next Patch Tuesday Update, to be released on May 14.

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