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OneNote could help with dyslexia learning disabilities, study finds

There are many learning disabilities that can make finding your groove in school just a little problematic. One such is dyslexia, a language-based disorder that is characterized by having difficulty reading and spelling. While there isn’t a treatment to ‘fix’ this disorder, systematic approaches often help children with dyslexia become efficient in these skills over time.

The British Dyslexia Association at Knowl Hill School in Surrey hosted an eleven-week study involving the effects of how some software could assist with dyslexia. Particularly, the Immersive Reader from Microsoft OneNote has been proven to help improve reading comprehension and writing skills (via WinBuzzer).

The software has dictation and text highlighting, making it possible for children with dyslexia able to follow along much easier and associate sounds with text symbols.

During the study that involved eighteen students, sixteen weren’t as overwhelmed or stressed while reading and eleven of them could even read easier. The independence of reading with the Microsoft OneNote can have a significant impact on student’s learning skills overall. After all, kids learn better when they are happy.

As a teacher from the Knowl Hill school explained to Sky News:

“It gives them more independence. If they’re really dyslexic and they can’t read really much at all, then they have to have someone else interpreting for them the whole time, reading and scribing. This puts that into their hands. They can do it themselves. And that’s the key thing for me and I think that’s why we saw an increase in their confidence over the period of the trial.”

Microsoft UK certainly showed interest int he findings. Ian Fordham, Director of Education Microsoft UK, even went on to say that this type of feedback only helps to make their products better. This could end up being a large-scale study at a future date that could significantly change how dyslexic learning will be approached in the modern classroom.

Do you know someone that struggles with dyslexia?