Office Delve updated, better people search, page authoring canvas, iOS and Android apps

Office Delve

Microsoft announced today some new improvements to Office Delve, the “Facebook for Office 365” service that provides Office 365 users with a way to provide information about themselves across their networks.  The new additions to the recently released Delve include better people search and discovery, a page authoring tool giving users blogging capabilities from within Delve, and mobile access via apps for Android and iOS, with Windows universal app support coming soon.

Delve has a new cleaner look and feel, and numerous ways to access its people centric content:

The look and feel of Delve has been updated to be cleaner and more action-oriented, and designed to help you find, connect and collaborate with the right people. The entire profile page is now responsive for a great experience across devices, from 4-inch screens up to the very largest displays. In addition to core profile information, each person’s organizational structure is now prominently displayed and easy to navigate. And there are numerous ways to get to someone’s profile: a Delve people search, clicking their name in OneDrive for Business or Outlook Web App (OWA), clicking About me and more.

Delve is joining the mobile first (although not Windows first) world, too, with new apps for both iOS and Android, and another animated Office video to show off the new features:

Delve is available now for iOS and Android, you can get the apps (needs an Office 365 account) in the download links below. As for Windows Phone, Microsoft addressed that in the FAQ in their blog post today:

Q. Do you have plans to support Windows Phone soon?
A. Yes, we are hard at work on a Delve universal app for Windows and expect to provide more information soon.

With Office Delve, Office 365 becomes not only a place to create and collaborate on documents, but a way to build out a modern company intranet, complete with employee profiles, blogs, and mobile access, with more to come.

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