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New Windows 8 logo brings Windows brand back to its roots, designer states

The designers of the new Windows 8 logo, Pentagram, explained that the new logo’s clean lines, flat shape, and bold color reflects the design principles of Microsoft’s Metro design language. On top of that, the new logo can now represent an actual window because of its transparency.

Microsoft officially revealed a new logo for Windows 8 that is no longer a flag, but a window.

“As Microsoft prepares for the launch of Windows 8, the new version of its operating system, it has announced a bold new identity that takes the iconic Windows logo back to its roots – as a window. Designed by Pentagram’s Paula Scher, the logo re-imagines the familiar four-color symbol as a modern geometric shape that introduces a new perspective on the Microsoft brand,” Pentagram explained on their official website. The question that was asked to Microsoft, “Your name is Windows. Why are you a flag?”

“I think the waving flag was meant to be a flag in perspective. All of the clichés of technology design are based on the idea that icons should look dimensional like product design that tech designers call ‘chrome’––look at the iPhone interface where everything has gradation and drop shadows,” Pentagram stated. Microsoft gave the explanation that its Windows brand began as a window, but progressed into a flag over the years due to the evolution of computers and technology.

This new identity returns the Windows logo to its roots. Windows was originally a metaphor for offering a new view on technology and now this new logo reintroduces this idea with the actual visual principles of perspective, while reflecting on the current Metro design language.

For those wondering why the color is so bland, it was made “deliberately neutral” so that it can “function effectively in a myriad of uses, especially motion.”


Animation of new logo’s transparency and motion. Transparent, it can become an actual window.


Animation of the transition from the flag to a shape.

Thanks to Joe for the news tip!

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