Microsoft’s Windows 10 update support is lacking, according to UK watchdog group Which?

Windows 10 general release was an arguable success for Microsoft with the argumentative part being how it became a success. Microsoft has yet to reveal the internal metrics the company used to judge the Windows 10 levels of success, but with 350 million installs and counting within a year and a half remains an impressive feat still.

However, the journey to those 350 million installs hasn’t been without its casualties and anecdotal horror stories, stories that UK consumer advocacy group Which? are now using to make a case that Microsoft’s customer service during the Windows 10 upgrade has been poor, to say the least.

According to a report from the BBC, the crux of Which?’s argument stems from the influx of user complaints levied at the Windows 10 upgrade prompt, webcam malfunctions after installations, concerns about the collection of personal data and general usability issues.

Perhaps, more damning than having a faulty upgrade experience with Windows 10 is the notion that hundreds of users claim to have had to pay to get their once properly functioning PCs, fixed. It is one thing to toil with the tedious process of upgrading, installing, rolling back and downgrading of software, it is another thing to have pay money to get something back in working order.

Once installed, people reported various problems, including printers, wi-fi cards and speakers no longer working with their PC; instances of lost files and email accounts no longer syncing; and, most significantly, their computer encountering such problems that they had to pay someone to repair it.”

Beyond the poor install experience lays another unflattering wrinkle for Microsoft with Which? Claiming it’s surveyed users ran into multiple instances of poor customer support from the company in regards to the botch Windows 10 upgrades.

Windows Ink Workspace on Windows 10

Windows Ink Workspace on Windows 10

Microsoft has yet to fully address Which?’s survey or complaints, offering only a vague public response to the BBC,

Customers have distinct options. Should a customer need help with the upgrade experience, we have numerous options including free customer support.”

With the company projected to see an increase in enterprise installs in the European region in the next few months, users should expect to see some complaints handled in various ways soon as it attempts to polish the overall experience for its largest customer base.

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