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Microsoft’s recent restructuring has been stressing out its employees

Microsoft's recent structuring has been stressing out its employees

Microsoft is going through a lot of changes since Satya Nadella took charge of the company. The company just got done with its third phase of restructuring by laying off another 3,000 employees as a part of the 18,000 job cuts announced back in July. This change is affecting the current employees, even before it was announced, because the lay offs were imminent as Microsoft completed its $7.2 billion acquisition of Nokia’s Devices and Services division.

Business Insider’s sources mentioned that most employees like Satya Nadella because of the changes he introduced within the company, restructuring most of the products, and working with its rivals — they launched Office for iPad which has received its fair share of success for the company since it requires Office 365 subscription for editing documents. The report further mentions that it’s not only the layoffs which are stressing out employees, it’s the constant change which is taking place within the company. 

“Constant change is not healthy when have an organization of over 100,000 people,” Business Insider’s source explained. “There’s a whole set of people that can’t deal with that constant change and at Microsoft there has definitely been a lot to deal with. Remember right before Ballmer left, he announced a bunch of stuff, the One Microsoft strategy, the Nokia acquisition. He had a plan that was to take us through the next few years.”

The people are also worried about the projects they are working on, if they’ll continue or not, and if their teams will be changed or remain the same. This definitely isn’t a very good thing for most people since they’ve dedicated their time developing a project, and getting to know their team members — knowing it may get canceled may not produce the best results. Additionally, new teams mean they have to get over the “understanding” part before they get comfortable working with them, which isn’t always the case. 

On the other hand, most of the folks who have been with the software giant for a longer term are happy with the changes, maybe because they feel the changes will steer them in a better direction. 

There’s no doubt the change is good, but it has to be in way that it doesn’t effect the people currently working in the company — some people don’t like too much change.

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