Microsoft Translator comes to Kindle Fire

If you’re an Amazon Fire tablet owner, then you’re likely accustomed to the relatively limited availability of apps compared to the greater Android ecosystem. Microsoft has supported Amazon Fire devices fairly well, except for offering the full Office Mobile suite and other first-party apps. Now, Microsoft has added another app to its cross-platform support on the Amazon Fire, Microsoft Translator.

The Translator blog provides the details, including making mention that Translator has been able to translate Kindle eBooks for some time now. From the blog’s description, it appears that Amazon Fire support is fairly complete:

  • Microsoft Translator translates text, pictures and even your conversations! It has a variety of features to help make your travels easier.
  • Get prepared for your trip by saving some phrases ahead of time that you know you’ll need later on—“Where is the taxi stand?”, “Can you drive me to (hotel name)” “How much does this cost?”…
  • Before you leave, download language packs so that you’ll be able to translate images and text during your trip even without an Internet connection.
  • Once you’ve reached your destination, you’ll be able to respond to something you didn’t plan for ahead of time by getting quick translations. Simply type or paste text, or even speak* into your device.
  • Translate images like street signs, headlines and menus without typing in the text. Just quickly snap a picture directly from the app and translate it in an instant. This also works with any picture you get from email, social media, texting, etc.
  • If you have access to the Internet, you can use the conversation feature to engage in natural conversations with locals—ask them about their favorite restaurants, cafes, and places to see.

So, if you’re heading out on an international trip and taking your Amazon Fire with you, then head over to the Appstore and download Microsoft Translator. Then let us know in the comments how the app is working out for you.

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