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Microsoft starts a new blog centered around OneNote’s educational uses

OneNote is coupled with Office Online

OneNote is Microsoft’s secret weapon when it comes to their Office suite. OneNote runs on all major platforms, and has great free apps. Due to the flexibility within OneNote it has been adopted by a range of different industries for a huge range of functions. The program aims to emulate a physical notebook with different sections and pages. It also allows users to mix a variety of content types on a page.

A major use of OneNote has been for educational purposes. From schools to corporate training manuals, OneNote has been replacing physical notebooks and binders. To keep up with all of the OneNote as an educational tool, Microsoft has created a new blog. This new blog will focus on the different ways OneNote has been used to make people more productive. The blog will focus on education across environments, such as business, personal, and schools.

In addition to the OneNote application, the blog will feature how tools such as the OneNote Notebook Creator tool has been used in different setting to make using OneNote easier. As new tools are created the blog will cover their impact for their specific purpose.

Microsoft starts a new blog centered around OneNote's educational uses

It is worth keeping in mind that Microsoft has put OneNote into its own group within the Office group. OneNote is the only one in their group and has been seeing renewed attention from Microsoft. OneNote is one of the newer Office programs, but Microsoft is treating it as a special case and giving it away for free to encourage people to give Microsoft another look.

Personally I use OneNote all day and every day. At work to keep track of projects, track to-do lists, and keep information in one place. When I go home I use OneNote to keep track of car maintenance, grocery lists, passwords and login information, lists of movies to see and books to read, and much more. If you haven’t given OneNote a serious look you should.

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