Logitech’s new Keys-To-Go keyboard keeps the spirit of the Touch Cover alive

Logitech’s new Keys-To-Go keyboard keeps the spirit of the Type Cover alive

As the Surface 3 and Pro 3 roll out to more reviewers and consumers, Microsoft is seeing critics finally warm up to their hybrid approach. The new Surface accolades, increased visibility, and sales do come at a small price. Microsoft is slowly finding what works and what doesn’t with the Surface line and in doing so, they’re cutting down on the creative and focusing on ‘what works.’

The original Surface, creatively launched with a Touch Cover and subsequent ‘Blades’ project, both are now a thing of the past. These thin and flat boards were supposed to bring a revolution to typing and dual-use productivity. The Surface Touch Cover and Blades’ doubled as compact, lightweight (programmable) keyboards and covers for the Surface. The keyboards slender designs was intended to help keep the entire Surface package svelte. Now that the Surface Pro 3 and Touch keyboards are becoming the face of Surface brand, the creativity of the Surface Touch Cover and ‘Blades’ are being tucked away in the closet.

Logitech may have inadvertently opened that closet door.

Logitech is announcing the Logitech Keys-To-Go Ultra-portable Keyboard, available for use beyond iOS. I couldn’t have made that name up if I tried. The new keyboard, which was already available for iOS, will now be available for use on Android and Windows devices.  The design of the stand-alone Bluetooth keyboard is very reminiscent of the Surface Touch Cover, right down to its water-repellent red, black, and blue FabricSkin. The new keyboard comes with a row of Android and Windows shortcut keys for people who operate either operating system to feel at home.

The Logitech Keys-To-Go will only work with devices sporting Windows 7 or higher as well as Android 4.1 or higher. The roll out of this device will be small and limited to a handful of countries in Asia alongside U.S. and Europe starting this month for $69.99.

Perhaps the small rollout is to gauge how litigious Mircosoft’s lawyers might be after seeing the ‘look-a-like’ keyboard in the public.

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