Kyocera’s concept Windows Phone device is not enough to stop a Microsoft lawsuit

Kyocera's concept Windows Phone device is not enough to stop a patent lawsuit from Microsoft

Last week, Japanese based Android handset maker Kyocera showed off a couple of handsets at Mobile World Congress (MWC). One was the ultra-rugged, Android-powered TORQUE, and another was a concept device showcasing what a Windows Phone version might look like once produced.

Unfortunately for Kyocera, Microsoft seemed less interested in the concept device and more interested in the Android based devices the Japanese electronics company provides.

Earlier this afternoon, Microsoft filed its legendary Android suit against Kyocera. For those unfamiliar, the suit seeks financial restitution and damages for Android-powered devices that infringe on patents owned by Microsoft. Unlike previous suits. However, Microsoft is also looking to prevent the company from selling future devices by also filing an injunction against select Kyocera handsets, specifically the Duraforce, Hydro, and Brigadier.

Kyocera's concept Windows Phone device is not enough to stop a patent lawsuit from Microsoft

The Microsoft/Android patent suit has been a bit nebulous to armchair lawyers but Microsoft has maintained that they hold at least 7 patents covering very specific approaches to battery life, location, power-saving, accelerometers, motion sensing, and some others in relation to mobile; that Android handset makers violate in their use of Android.

When asked about the suit, Microsoft responded:

“We respect Kyocera, but we believe they need to license the patented technology they are using. We’re hopeful this case can be resolved amicably.”

With Microsoft already earning an estimated 2 billion a year from existing licenses with bigger name OEMs like LG, HTC and until recently Samsung, it seems like an almost foregone conclusion that Kyocera will be rolled into the fold.

Perhaps Kyocera’s concept phone was a peace offering to stem the extent of the suit and get Microsoft into a more negotiable mood.

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