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IDC: Windows Phone reinforces its third place position behind iOS and Android

Lumia 520 Windows Phone 8 devices

IDC has published a new report today detailing the current state of the smartphone operating system market share. According to new data as of Q2 2013, Microsoft’s Windows Phone platform has reinforced its third place position in the smartphone operating system market share, right behind iOS and Android.

“Windows Phone posted the largest year-over-year increase among the top five smartphone platforms, and in the process reinforced its position as the number 3 smartphone operating system. Driving this result was Nokia, which released two new smartphones and grew its presence at multiple mobile operators. But beyond Nokia, Windows Phone remained a secondary option for other vendors, many of which have concentrated on Android. By comparison, Nokia accounted for 81.6% of all Windows Phone smartphone shipments during 2Q13,” IDC stated.

Android continues to dominate, thanks to Samsung and its Galaxy S4 product. Android saw a total of 187.4 million Android-powered smartphones shipped during the second quarter. Apple’s iOS platform continued to hold the second place spot, selling 31.2 million smartphones during the second quarter.

Microsoft’s Windows Phone platform, on the other hand, saw 8.7 million shipments during the quarter, and a big thank you is being directed towards Nokia. “Last quarter we witnessed Windows Phone shipments surpassing BlackBerry and the trend has continued into the second quarter. Nokia has clearly been the driving force behind the Windows Phone platform and we expect that to continue. However, as more and more vendors enter the smartphone market using the Android platform, we expect Windows Phone to become a more attractive differentiator in this very competitive market segment,” IDC added.

Nokia accounts for 81.6% of all Windows Phone devices shipped during the quarter, with Samsung coming in second place 11.5%. Head over to the source link if you are interested in seeing the charts.

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