Google believes they ‘share the same soul’ as Microsoft

Earlier today, we reported on Microsoft’s ‘Connect’ developer conference, where the company is hosting a two-day gathering to spur interest in Windows 10 development. At the conference, Microsoft introduced various initiatives to cater to developers across multiple and different focuses. Microsoft’s support efforts include massive upgrades for the Visual Studio Community such as a free online cross-platform version of VS, as well as shared development with the open source community.

As part of Microsoft’s continued effort to embrace its collaborative future, the company also invited Google’s technical program manager Jules Kremer, on stage at the conference to show its willingness to work with Google. However, it was a Google engineering director, Brad Green, who took this opportunity to cash in on some positive PR positioning, reported by GeekWire.

It really became apparent that we share the same soul, and we’ve been able to work really well together because of that.”

While Green’s statement seems to fly in the face of what most people believe to be a fiercely competitive relationship between Google and Microsoft, it was made in regards to a particular project. Both Microsoft and Google are collaborating on what’s being called the Angular project, which looks to develop a framework for JavaScript applications. Helping the Angular project along, Google engineering teams are using Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code and TypeScript to develop Angular 2.

While on stage, Kremer further emphasized Google’s belief in a collaborative relationship with Microsoft.

There’s a lot to love about Google and Microsoft working together on an open-source project.”

For many Windows users, however, Google’s sentiments about ‘shared soul’ and ‘working together’ may ring hollow as collaborative efforts have yet to produce any seemingly real-world benefits for Windows users. For now, it seems Google is willing to work with Microsoft when its efforts do not cross any of its competing businesses. Unfortunately, that may leave a tiny intersection of collaboration between the two companies.

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What do you think of Google's comments at Microsoft's Connect developer conference?