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Dell upgrades their tablets and displays to stay on the bleeding edge

Dell upgrades their tablets and displays to stay on the bleeding edge

Dell has upgraded their tablet and monitor offering as well as revealed a new “Smart Desk” concept, which brings together a variety of Dell’s technology in a single package. The improvements to their tablets and monitors are reasonable and expected for evolving their products to stay in line with the rest of the industry.

In addition to mentioning the improved processor, battery, and screen, Dell makes a big point of communicating that their products are more manageable for IT departments; this is a big selling point when it comes to appealing to large companies who have complex IT needs. Dell cites a survey of IT staff, where they believe that tablets will be more work to manage than a traditional laptop. This is the motive for making a tablet which runs full Windows and is managed just like any other company PC.

Improving devices is always important for companies to keep their products relevant. Dell has done just this by increasing the specs on their Dell Venue 11 Pro 7000 Series tablet. The tablet has the new Intel Core M processor, which enables  a thinner, fan-less, and improved battery design. Dell also has focused on giving certain professions a great experience by enabling the tablet to be fully sanitized for healthcare and a mobile payment solution for retail. Dell has also detailed the release of their 5K monitor which will be “less than $2000” and will launch on Nov. 20th in China and Dec. 18th in the US. The Dell Venue 11 Pro 7000 Series tablet will be available on Nov. 11th starting at $699.99 (keyboard included).

5K display from Dell

These are incremental upgrades to competitive products in a very competitive market. Dell seems to be advertising themselves as very business friendly and very accommodating of special case IT solutions. There seems to be less of a consumer focus, which may be a good thing, because sometimes good PC makers can get lost in the rabbit hole of chasing consumer desires.

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