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Recent Posts

Improving Access to the Public Domain: the Public Domain Mark

Today, Creative Commons announces the release of its Public Domain Mark, a tool that enables works free of known copyright restrictions to be labeled in a way that allows them to be easily discovered over the Internet. The Public Domain Mark, to be used for marking works already free of copyright, complements Creative Commons’ CC0 public domain dedication, which enables authors to relinquish their rights prior to the expiration of copyright...

Google Testing Chrome OS Release Candidates. Official Release 1 Month Away?

It was last July that Google dropped a nuclear bomb in announcing Chrome OS, their operating system based around their Chrome web browser. The world was different back then — namely, Google’s Android mobile operating system wasn’t nearly as powerful as it is now. But its rise has led some to wonder why exactly Google is pushing ahead with Chrome OS — or if they might abandon it? (Remember, they did lose their key Chrome OS engineer to Facebook.) Well, they’re not. All indications are that it is coming very soon now. In fact, it may even launch a month from today...

Website and story bug submission instructions

If you encounter a bug in either the main site or forums, please post a new topic in the Bug Tracker thread. Please describe in detail what the bug is and provide a screenshot if you can.

Microsoft, Comcast, Yahoo: no zombie cookies here, Congress!

Representatives Edward Markey (D-MA) and Joe Barton (R-TX) are probing the online privacy policies of major Web content providers, and the responses are in: leading website operators all assure Capitol Hill that they either use Flash cookies in a limited context, or they don't use them at all. But the replies from Microsoft, Verizon, Comcast, MySpace, Yahoo!, and six other companies don't seem to have made Markey, or even the more conservative Barton, very happy...

Pushing the Boundaries of HTML5 Gaming: Jitterbugs

Given the support for full hardware acceleration in IE9, we were eager to see how far we could push the platform. Until now, there has not been an impressive selection of HTML5 games, or rather, the games that are there around are limited in their level of interactivity. For instance, the most highly rated games on Chrome Experiments at the time of writing are implementations of Solitaire and Tetris, games that were well within the capabilities of Windows 3.1...